Black Garlic

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What Is Black Garlic?

 

Black garlic is produced by allowing regular garlic to age in low heat for about three to four weeks. This allows it to undergo the Maillard reaction, a chemical process that occurs between amino acids and reducing the sugars. The process gives the garlic a dark color, chewy texture, and distinct flavor and aroma, but it also enhances the nutritional value of this super food even more. Gone are the harsh smell that burns your eyes,  comes out of your pours and breath. This product has been pealed and ground into a paste for easy usage.

The black garlic taste is usually described as tangy with a syrupy, balsamic flavor, almost like truffles. It works well in savory and sweet dishes alike and can be used in everything from meat blends to desserts.

Why Black Garlic?

According to the Journal of Food and Drug Analysis, black garlic demonstrates much higher biological activity than fresh garlic, including its antioxidant properties.

According to the International Journal of Preventive Medicine found that intakes of aged garlic are inversely associated with cancer. Twenty-five studies that focused on cancer incidences and aged garlic exposure were evaluated for the review, with results from human, animal and lab studies having mostly consistent reports.

Nutrition per the US Dept. of Agriculture:

Two tablespoons of black garlic contains approximately: 

  • 40 calories

  • 4 grams carbohydrates

  • 1 gram protein

  • 2 grams fat

  • 1 gram dietary fiber

  • 160 milligrams sodium (7 percent DV)

  • 0.64 milligram iron (4 percent DV)

  • 2.2 milligrams vitamin C (4 percent DV)

  • 20 milligrams calcium (2 percent DV)